Tag Archives: Elderly Care Home

"Broken covenant": healthcare aides' "experience of the ethical" in caring for dying seniors in a personal care home.

J Clin Ethics. 2010; 21(3): 201-11
McClement S, Lobchuk M, Chochinov HM, Dean R

Canada’s population is aging, and seniors constitute the fastest growing demographic in the nation. The chronic health conditions, limited social support, functional decline, and cognitive impairment experienced by seniors may necessitate admission to a personal care home (PCH) setting up until the time of their death. The ethical problems that arise in the care of dying patients are numerous and complicated. The care of dying seniors in PCHs, however, is largely provided by frontline workers such as healthcare aides (HCAs), who usually have little training in palliative care or ethics. Research examining the identification and resolution of ethical problems in care of the dying has been conducted from the perspectives of nurses and physicians in various clinical settings, but the voice of HCAs in PCHs is virtually absent from clinical ethics. Given that the inability to satisfactorily resolve ethical issues in clinical practice is associated with feelings of guilt, powerlessness, avoiding contact with patients, failing to provide good physical care, and increased staff turnover, an empirical examination of HCAs’ experiences of ethically challenging situations is warranted. We conducted a phenomenological study to access the lived experience of HCAs (N = 12) working in proprietary and nonproprietary care homes as they encountered situations they deemed ethically challenging in providing end-of-life care to dying seniors. The findings reported here explicate: (1) the types of situations that are ethically problematic for HCAs; (2) the meanings they assign to these situations, and (3) the impact such situations have on the provision of end-of-life care.

Privatization of social services: Quality differences in Swedish elderly care.

Soc Sci Med. 2010 Nov 24;
Stolt R, Blomqvist P, Winblad U

One of the major policy trends in recent decades has been the privatization of social services. This trend has also reached Sweden, a welfare state with health care and social service sectors that previously had almost no private providers. One of the most affected areas is elderly care, i.e. home-help services and residential care provided to citizens older than 65 years, where the proportion of private providers increased from 1% in 1990 to 16% in 2010. The ongoing privatization in Sweden and many other countries has raised important questions regarding the consequences of this policy transformation. In this paper, we present a cross-sectional study comparing the quality of services in private and public elderly care. Using statistics from 2007 displaying a variety of quality dimensions covering over 99% of all elderly care residents in Sweden, we were able to show that privatization is indeed associated with significant quality differences. Structural quality factors such as the number of employees per resident was significantly smaller (-9%) in private elderly care. On the other hand, the proportion of residents participating in the formulation of their care plan (+7%), the proportion of elderly with a reasonable duration between evening meal and breakfast (+15%), and the proportion of elderly offered different food alternatives (+26%) were significantly in favour of private contractors. Our conclusion is that private care providers seem to emphasize service aspects rather than structural prerequisites for good care.

"Broken covenant": healthcare aides' "experience of the ethical" in caring for dying seniors in a personal care home.

J Clin Ethics. 2010; 21(3): 201-11
McClement S, Lobchuk M, Chochinov HM, Dean R

Canada’s population is aging, and seniors constitute the fastest growing demographic in the nation. The chronic health conditions, limited social support, functional decline, and cognitive impairment experienced by seniors may necessitate admission to a personal care home (PCH) setting up until the time of their death. The ethical problems that arise in the care of dying patients are numerous and complicated. The care of dying seniors in PCHs, however, is largely provided by frontline workers such as healthcare aides (HCAs), who usually have little training in palliative care or ethics. Research examining the identification and resolution of ethical problems in care of the dying has been conducted from the perspectives of nurses and physicians in various clinical settings, but the voice of HCAs in PCHs is virtually absent from clinical ethics. Given that the inability to satisfactorily resolve ethical issues in clinical practice is associated with feelings of guilt, powerlessness, avoiding contact with patients, failing to provide good physical care, and increased staff turnover, an empirical examination of HCAs’ experiences of ethically challenging situations is warranted. We conducted a phenomenological study to access the lived experience of HCAs (N = 12) working in proprietary and nonproprietary care homes as they encountered situations they deemed ethically challenging in providing end-of-life care to dying seniors. The findings reported here explicate: (1) the types of situations that are ethically problematic for HCAs; (2) the meanings they assign to these situations, and (3) the impact such situations have on the provision of end-of-life care.

What is a good name for an elderly care home? (For an assisted living home)?

Caring for the Elderly
roxy39_2002 asked:

My friend wants to start a care home for the elderly and I would like to know if any of you have a warm nice feel-to-it name that would go great for a care home. FYI, you must use the words Assisted Living or Care Home in the name. Thanks.
This is in Arizona by the way, I’m going to need something like Palm Living or something like that.

Kendall